29. Measuring the Young Modulus

Thomas talks Robin and Patrick through his method of measuring the Young Modulus that can be done as an individual experiment rather than in groups.

Timestamps

  • Disclaimer @ 00:00
  • Episode starts @ 01:22
  • Physics in the News – James Webb Telescope update @ 03:40
  • Remember the Survey @ 05:04
  • Measuring the Young Modulus @ 05:45

Summary

A brief cameo from Thomas’ daughter who is staying with Patrick Kaplo kicks off the podcast and leads to a chat about interns in American Schools before Thomas steers back to the James Webb Telescope which has cleared its final Thermal Vacuum test. Then on to the topic of the day – how to measure the Young Modulus as a class practical with minimal equipment. Thomas has blogged about this in detail and also had a go at making a video!

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

28. Maths in Physics, What’s the Point?

We discuss what’s gone well and badly this week with guest presenter Cara Wood and then chat about James de Winter’s thoughts on Maths in Physics teaching.

Timestamps

  • Introducing the Survey @ 01:45
  • What’s gone well and badly this week? @ 02:46
  • James de Winter interview @ 08:50
  • Post James chat @ 25:12

Summary

Cara Wood (she of the plucky string in episode 27) steps in for Patrick Kaplo to share her thoughts about what has gone well and badly this week. James de Winter then talks about Maths in Physics teaching: what can learned from the Maths department and the challenges Physics Teachers face. He mentions research by the ASE about cooperation between Maths and Physics departments and also Ed Southall’s book “Yes, but why?”. He also talks about how he has used numberless graphs and suggests a question you can ask yourself before each activity: What’s the point?

Cara reminded Thomas about the graph scale selector, but we couldn’t find a link to an example, can you?

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

27. Ways to teach… Waves

Thomas, Robin and Patrick introduce and discuss many ways of teaching waves that have been shared by the listener.

Timestamps

  • Physics in the News – Blue Origin @ 01:07
  • Ways to teach… Waves @ 01:50
    • Cara Wood and a piece of string @ 02:20
    • Slinkys @ 06:50
    • Making many nodes @ 10:54
    • Salt Pendulum @ 13:47
    • Acetates @ 14:58
      • Jed’s wave visualisation experiment @ 16:48
    • How to remember the difference between Transverse and longitudinal @ 18:59
    • Alom Shaha and the Jelly Baby Wave Machine @ 20:17
    • Standing waves @ 24:51
    • Ruben’s Tube and Kundts Tube @ 28:01
    • Showing colour mixing and projector polarisation @ 30:43
    • Young’s slits – lab scale with sound @ 32:47
    • PhEt @ 33:38
    • Mexican Wave @ 34:20
    • Tell us misconceptions! #tptpmisconception @ 35:25
    • Who won Alom Shaha’s Book? @ 37:43

Summary

Patrick, Thomas and Robin get together to tackle ways to teach waves but not until they have touched on Jeff Bezos’ bid for extra-terrestrial adventure: Blue Origin.

Cara Wood was first up sharing tips for teaching waves.  She introduces waves by simply getting students to pluck a piece of string held in their teeth, so that they can see, feel and hear vibrations, experience amplitude and frequency, and discuss waves travelling through solids and gases.  Patrick loved this: really giving a tactile encounter with waves and their source.  Robin made the tenuous link to cochlear implants.  Very similar is the metal coat hanger demo.

“You can’t beat a Slinky” according to Dan Toomey – thanks Dan!  Patrick put us onto “Snakey springs” on amazon for a mighty £27, but we found them cheaper with a bit of persistence: £5.75 at Select School Supplies. Snakey Springs help to avoid Slinky tangles when demo-ing transverse waves.  Thanks to Graham Thomson for the tip of setting a ball next to the slinky spring so that it gets struck as the wave passes and you can thus link frequency and energy.  Graham pointed out the rich discussions you can have on time period, frequency, wave speed and wavelength all with the Slinky.  Thomas was really impressed with Frank Noschese’s video using paper cups next to the Slinky to demonstrate constructive and destructive interference.  Robin recalled a similar method to this to demonstrate the vibrational link to sound waves.

Frank Noschese masters the Slinky

Thanks to Dr Joshua Griffiths and Graham Thompson who talked about challenging students to produce features on ropes and Slinkies, such as increasing numbers of standing waves and purposely frustrating by asking for high frequency, long-wavelength waves.  This gives a good discussion of why it can’t be done!

Thanks to all the other folk too numerous to mention, who also pointed us towards the Slinky as a ‘must-have’ for teaching waves.

Thanks to Dan Toomey for the salt / sand pendulum video.  Thomas was delighted to report he had already done this and Patrick was keen to have a go.

John Hamilton’s use of acetate wave traces to demonstrate superposition makes a tough concept much easier for students to visualise – thanks John!  Jed Marshall uses acetates to get across the tricky idea of wavefronts, alongside his ripple tank that students can struggle with and he kindly supplied a booklet to show how it worked. (photos below).

How’s this for a handy mnemonic for longitudinal vs. transverse?  Thanks to Chris Beason and K Physics 1.

Alom Shaha joined us for his PIM and he described his jelly baby wave machine. The video says it all: easy to make, and as Alom says, transformative in the teaching of waves! Reflection, refraction, amplitude and frequency – all easily demo-ed quickly and cheaply. Despite Jelly Babies being lost in translation, Patrick endorsed the machine and he still uses it, although the Gummy Bears may be past their sell-by date!

Signal generators, strings and vibration generators always go over well, particularly in conjunction with a stroboscope and Patrick described how he challenges students, not least through atmospheric use of Pink Floyd music! Don’t forget your Rubens tube too – it really helps discussing pressure differentials in sound waves. And if anyone has any tips to get the Kundt’s tube to work, let us know!

Paul from @PlanetReynolds on Twitter had a lovely dichromatic crystals demo which has “Wow factor” and his toppling dominos is a great way of demonstrating density’s effect on wave transmission. Just search on eBay for “optical glass cube” and “100 led finger lights“.

Thanks again to Dan Toomey for his tip on using superposition with loudspeakers, and don’t forget PhET, ripple tanks and “stadium waves”!

…and finally! Well done to Frank Noschese who we picked from the expensively engineered randomised name selection device. Frank will receive a personally signed copy of Alom Shaha’s Recipes for Wonder.

HAVE A GREAT HALF TERM!!

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode. Please do leave a voice memo: Thomas thinks nobody loves him.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form
A Swiss Roll

26. Finding Physics Teaching at Fifty-Three

Thomas, Robin and Patrick Kaplo hear from Jonathan Shaw, a late career change to Physics teaching who is in his NQT year at 53 years old. Jonathan also challenges the team to select the most important equipment for a new physics department.

Timestamps

  • Vacuum cannon update @ 00:39
  • Ways to teach… Waves reminder @ 01:04
  • Physics in the News: Coal Free Electricity in the UK @ 02:39
  • Energy storage with cars @ 03:56
  • Jonathan Shaw, NQT @ 04:47
  • After the interview discussion @ 20:40
    • Swiss Roll @ 20:44
  • Which equipment should a Physics department have? @ 29:35

Summary

Thomas reminds us that the Vacuum Cannon can once more be ordered in the shop (for delivery in early June). Physics In The News leads to a chat about the UK’s coal-free week and the idea of load balancing with electric cars. This week’s guest is Jonathan Shaw, a successful businessman and entrepreneur who found his true calling as a Physics teacher late in life. What he says challenges Patrick, Thomas and Robin to justify practical work and also to come up with the equipment that a Physics department should have if starting from scratch. Robin gives his top tips for teaching other teachers to use oscilloscopes but is sceptical about a virtual oscilloscope but Thomas recommends the one at academo.org. Share your list with @physicstp on twitter with the hash tag #tptpequipment.

Ways to teach… Waves

Episode 27 will be all about ways to teach Waves. How do you do it and what works best for you? You have until Saturday night to give us your ideas, and one of them will win Alom Shaha’s excellent book Recipes for Wonder.

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode. Please do leave a voice memo: Thomas thinks nobody loves him.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

25. Fusion, Triangular Teaching and Avoiding Dead Leaves

Thomas, Robin and Patrick Kaplo discuss the re-release of the vacuum cannon, the ITER fusion project, Prof W Brian Lane tells us his PIM and James De Winter talks about avoiding “Plugging and Chugging”.

Timestamps

  • Welcome back Patrick Kaplo @ 00:37
  • The Vacuum Cannon is back @ 01:10
  • Physics in the news: ITER and fusion @ 02:07
  • Prof. W Brian Lane and his Spring Lab @ 04:23
  • Differences between US and UK systems @ 13:21
  • James De Winter and Maths in Physics @ 20:24
  • Please give us some Waves teaching tips @ 27:31

Summary

Patrick Kaplo joins the team once more. Thomas announces that the Vacuum Cannon can once more be ordered in the shop (for delivery in early June). Physics In The News leads to a chat about Fusion at ITER and how it is always 25 years away. Thomas introduces Prof. W Brian Lane who first appeared in Episode 20 (Ways to teach… Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration). Discussing it, Thomas and Patrick get a bit sidetracked talking about our different systems before Robin steers them back to the idea of teaching with a triple whammy of Theory, Simulation and Practical. Thomas then plays a short section of a chat Robin had with James De Winter about the place of Maths in Physics and avoiding “Plugging and Chugging”.

Patrick Kaplo modelling the t-shirt
Patrick Kaplo rocks the retro tptp look.

Ways to teach… Waves

Episode 27 (assuming we make it) will be all about ways to teach Waves. How do you do it and what works best for you?

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode. Please do leave a voice memo: Thomas thinks nobody loves him.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Patrick’s theme tune is from Hail to the Chief Bluegrass Banjo by Tom Adams from BanjoNews.com under Fair Use.

Send Message
Reset Form

24. YouTuber Lewis Matheson and A Level Physics On-Line

Lewis Matheson tells how he gave up classroom teaching to become a YouTuber with his channel A-Level Physics On-Line.

Timestamps

  • Ways to Teach… Waves reminder and new competition @ 01:18
  • Physics in the News: Accelerating Universe Expansion @ 02:31
  • Lewis Matheson interview @ 05:56
  • Post Interview chat @ 21:49

Summary

Physics in the news this week is the improvement of the evidence that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. This leads to discussion of how distant galaxies are going to disappear over time, but also the Infrared Catastrophe. The main interview is with Lewis Matheson, ex-Physics teacher who is now a full-time podcaster with his website A Level Physics On-Line and its related YouTube Channels.

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

23. Minds-On as well as Hands-On: Alom Shaha

Alom Shaha talks about his book “Mr Shaha’s Recipes for Wonder”, his love of Practical, the videos he makes to support teachers and equality.

Timestamps

  • Physics in the News: Black Hole Photo @ 01:01
  • Katie Bouman @ 2:24
  • Emails from listeners @ 06:29
  • Announcing the next Ways to teach… episode @ 08:29
  • Alom Shaha intro @ 10:06
    • Recipes for Wonder @ 11:42
    • Parents are the first teachers @ 12:29
    • Alom’s Videos and helping teachers of Physics @ 23:00
    • Inclusivity @ 31:55
  • Competition! @ 38:02

Summary

Physics in the news is (of course) the recent first ever photo of a Black Hole by the Event Horizon Telescope; Thomas mentioned the XKCD cartoon that gives its scale. We then thanked some listeners who have contacted the podcast before introducing Alom Shaha. Alom has (with Emily Robertson) created a book for Primary Age children that encourages them to do Science with their parents: Recipes for Wonder. Alom also has a YouTube channel (Sciencefilms) that is aimed at teachers. Alom had a lot of interesting things to sy so this is our longest episode yet.

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

22. Technicians and Teacher Talk

In 1927, the Solvay conference brought together the likes of Einstein, Curie, Schrodinger, de Broglie, Dirac, Bohr and on and on. That was the highest density of physicists until a couple of weeks ago when Robin caught up with Chris, David, Steve and Ben at Uppingham school.

In the same way that drunk guys start to talk about their mums, teachers will start talking about technicians and how wonderful they are. We point out how essential, precious and endangered they are. We encourage teachers to make sure their technicians are given professional recognition. Make sure they are fully included and feel that they are equal members of the science team. Technicians need professional development and should be included in professional dialog. Check out http://www.preproom.org and techognition for more (since publishing this episode have had even more suggestions and there is now a dedicated page for technician focused sites).

Timestamps

  • Lewis Matheson from alevelphysicsonline.com and vacuum cannons sold out @ 01:14
  • Americans going back to the Moon @ 03:06
  • Space Suits @ 03:37
  • Physics teachers and technicians @ 05:59
  • Practical in Memoriam @ 21:40
  • Closing the episode @ 35:23

Summary

Robin had a round table discussion with four other teachers at Uppingham School. Dr David Boyce, Ben Dickens, Steve Allen and Chris Shepherd.

Of course with so many of us, we had to discuss our practicals in memoriam. The Whoosh Bottle is a lot of fun. We found a video of the tin foil speaker but it does not show the setup: Thomas had reasonable success with a signal generator on low impedance, but the volume was pretty quiet before the sig gen borked. Pushing a current through glass does work, and the video Robin found is certainly not a CLEAPPS approved method.

Thanks to the wonderful gang for a great natter. Apologies though to Steve: the censors cut our discussion of how to maintain dignity while talking about those areas of physics that have… a double-meaning (Uranus or Kundt’s Tube anyone?). We may air it at the end of the year when we will be off on our hols to allow the furore to pass.

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

21. The Rev

Robin and Thomas gush somewhat when chatting to ex-colleague The Reverend Tim Hardingham, Physics Teacher and ordained minister who qualified as a teacher in 1972.

Timestamps

  • Introducing “The Rev” @ 00:30
  • Nuffield @ 02:05
  • Tim’s advice to non-specialists @ 03:40
  • Tim’s favourite practical? @ 05:18
  • Thomas and Robin reminisce about working with Tim @ 07:32
  • Modelling SHM @ 08:20
  • Tim on teaching with modelling @ 12:12
  • Patrick Kaplo Challenge Lab (Crash Point) @ 14:17
  • The World needs physicists @ 21:00

Summary

A bugbear of mine is the recurrent attempt to somehow set science up in opposition to the arts or humanities.  I have met countless cultured scientists with deep interest in the aesthetic , in history, in the human condition at its broadest, and so I start this week’s notes with a parallel to one of the classic works of the modern age: Wayne’s World.  For when Thomas and I met this week’s guest, it was redolent of the eponymous hero and his sidekick, Garth falling to their knees before Alice Cooper, crying “We’re not worthy” in tremoring falsetto. 

“The Rev” as Tim Hardingham is affectionately known is a true physics teaching behemoth.  He is a wealth of practical knowledge and is the most generous gracious individual you could meet.  We were both delighted to spend time with Tim talking about teaching physics, the Nuffield Physics days when the curriculum was led by subject, not assessment considerations and the sheer joy of teaching physics which as regular listeners will know is the lifeblood of the podcast.

Tim’s practical in memoriam was – of course- a belter.  Tim loves electromagnetism and his passion bubbles through as he talks about a lovely piece of physics – easy to demonstrate but a pig to explain – connecting a coil, mounted on a pair of iron C-cores, in series with a battery and bulb. ‘Break’ the C-cores and blow the bulb! … Now explain. 

Thomas and Robin shared their favourite Hardingham moments and there is a spreadsheet available with his SHM instructions (and also starting spreadsheet for modelling SHM) , but perhaps the most uniquely physics element of Tim’s teaching is his delight in challenging students to explain complex concepts.  Grasping and explaining complexity is at the heart of physics and far from seeing it as a drawback, Tim makes it central to his teaching.  Try channelling your inner Rev and hold out on giving students the answer.  The trick is to do this with Tim’s twinkle and affection for the students. 

Tim also responds to a new Challenge Lab from Patrick Kaplo ; “Crash Point” where a car steadily climbing an inclined plane triggers the release of a dynamics trolley. Can the students predict where they will collide?

Tim’s always been an advocate for the subject and Thomas and I were both privileged to work with him.  He could do a daily podcast on physics teaching and never run out of material.  If you fancy being a bit more ‘Rev’, revive a Nuffield practical from one of the Nuffield “Red” books Thomas mentioned (Book 1 and Book 2)..  Have fun and don’t tell ‘em the answer!

Join in!

Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form

20. Ways to teach… Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration

The second “Ways to Teach” episode where we channel tips from our wonderfully generous contributors.  Teachers of Physics are heroes as we never tire of saying, and they have been so generous with their time, sharing a wealth of wisdom on helping students get to grips with displacement, velocity and acceleration.  

Timestamps

  • Vacuum cannon back in stock (and new t-shirts) @ 01:38
  • General advice on teaching displacement, velocity and acceleration @ 2:56
  • Measuring real things in the real World @ 07:56
  • Using an ultrasound displacement sensor @ 22:15
  • Data on real things in the real World/ worksheets @ 23:57
  • Maps and treasure hunts @ 25:18
  • Simulations @ 31:01
  • Videos @ 34:50
  • Plenary Yoga @ 36:05

Summary

Thomas announces that there is a new t-shirt design and the vacuum cannon is back in stock. Thomas and Robin chat about the suggestions sent in by Physic teachers on how they teach displacement, velocity and acceleration. After a few tips they break the suggestions down in to:

Blue toy car
Not constant velocity car, but close enough
  • Measuring Real Things in the Real World: toy cars, woodlice, the teacher, the students…
  • Live graphs with an ultrasonic position sensor
  • Using data from the real World. e.g. The Usain Bolt vs Stephen Hawking PowerPoint.
  • Simulations and sensors: Simulations such as echalk.co.uk, the PhET moving man and the Universe and More are all useful. PhyPhox is a really useful app for exposing the sensors on your phone.
  • Maps and Treasure Hunts: google maps allows you to measure distances if you right click.
  • Videos: e.g. the ISS video below
  • Yoga.

Here are some more details:

  • Use x for position and Δx for displacement instead of d and s which are confusing (thanks @PhysGal)
  • USE GRAPHS A LOT!! – thanks to Paul Reynolds, Imogen, Matt Harding and others – all graphs tell a story (chocolate versus happiness etc), Dan Twomey leaves the numbers out of it until later so that the shape of the graph is discussed first 
  • Explicit teaching of “per” “÷” and “/” all being the same – Tom Norris star of episode 19 and don’t use formula triangles – controversial – may be a last resort for kids as they approach their exam. 
  • Most popular – measuring real things in the real world – constant-velocity cars, woodlice, students on the athletics track all help students to relate real-world motion to the graph story.  There are loads of good descriptions in the podcast and I guarantee you’ll hear something new to try (thanks Molly Ann, Dan Hannard and Brian Lane).
  • John Hamilton told us about falling cupcakes (here’s an A-level practical that uses cupcake cases): simple, cheap and reliable.   What’s not to love? 
  • Thomas’s friend Sylvia joined us to describe the human ticker timer and how it helps students to understand how a ticker timer works. 
  • Cara, Mr Holliday, Paul Reynolds and one of Robin’s lovely former colleagues (thanks James!) all talked about live graphs with motion sensors – the software that comes with the sensor will help to get your students acting out motion and so thinking carefully about what story the graphs are telling.  Really popular with the students this one! 
  • Tom recommended some analysis of car chases and 100m races on video, while @e=mc2andallthat has a tongue-in-cheek PowerPoint that details a race between Usain Bolt and Stephen Hawking.
  • Fabio di Salvo introduced the idea of using a real map (and don’t forget Google Maps could be a good homework here!) to compare ‘crow flies’ displacement to ‘path taken’ distance travelled. 
  • Nigel from Essex joined us to talk about using superhero The Flash in his lesson to get  students thinking about and measuring their speed and thus saving the Academy from a bomb attack.
  • Dan Toomey shared the PhET simulation “The Moving Man” as a way for students to see a graph plotted in real time.  Thomas liked it but thought Bernard Rand’s suggestion “TheUniverseandMore.com” was really special with a graphing challenge
  • Robin’s favourite are the apps that access the internal sensors in mobile phones such as https://phyphox.org/ and Google Journal, that will measure acceleration and allow students to analyse their motion (for example on the bus to school) and tell the story of the motion. 
  • Don’t forget videos!  Thomas and Robin loved one shared by Ruben Calverd showing acceleration in the ISS (you can watch it below if you are on the web site) – thanks Ruben!  Please remember to share any nice videos on @physicsTP 
  • Paul Reynolds wrapped things up with a description of “graph yoga”  A great bit of fun as a plenary… Namaste, Paul! 

Fancy hearing something on a future “Ways to teach…”?  Just let us know via the usual channels!  Thanks for listening. 


Please share ideas or successes – or indeed questions – on our Facebook Page: https://fb.me/physicstp .  You can also message us via our website contact form at the.physicsteachingpodcast.com, Twitter @physicstp, email using  the address given in the podcast (if we remember) or by leaving a voice memo using WhatsApp or Telegram to the phone number in our Twitter profile, +44 7898 814716 (don’t call the number, nobody will answer, just hold down the microphone icon and speak your message). Don’t forget to tell us your name because we may use your audio in a future episode.

The music we use remains One legged equilibrist polka by Circus Homunculus.

Send Message
Reset Form